Noteworthy News

California Has Driest Year Ever -- And It May Get Worse
The shore of California’s Lake Oroville hasn’t looked this way in modern history. Cracked dry mud shatters the canyon floor, and buoys rest 10 feet up the side of a shale hill. 
The Flood Next Time
The little white shack at the water’s edge in Lower Manhattan is unobtrusive — so much so that the tourists strolling the promenade at Battery Park the other day did not give it a second glance.
Colorado River Drought Forces a Painful Reckoning for States
The sinuous Colorado River and its slew of man-made reservoirs from the Rockies to southern Arizona are being sapped by 14 years of drought nearly unrivaled in 1,250 years.
Kerry Quietly Makes Priority of Climate Pact
As a young naval officer in Vietnam, John Kerry commanded a Swift boat up the dangerous rivers of the Mekong Delta. But when he returned there last month as secretary of state for the first time since 1969, he spoke not of past firefights but of climate change.
Catching Rays in California, and Storing Them
Solar power is growing so fast in California — with installations by customers increasing tenfold since 2006 — that it is turning the state’s power system upside down.
Poll: Americans see impact of global warming
Most Americans say global warming is serious and want the United States to address it, but their support for government regulations has fallen in recent years, says a poll Fridayconducted for USA TODAY.
Hormone-disrupting chemicals found in water at fracking sites
Water samples collected at Colorado sites where hydraulic fracturing was used to extract natural gas show the presence of chemicals that have been linked to infertility, birth defects and cancer, scientists reported Monday.
Experts Eye Oil and Gas Industry as Quakes Shake Oklahoma
Mary Catherine Sexton has been rattled enough.
Energy Department to Give $226 Million to Support Nuclear Reactor Design
The Energy Department will give a small company in Corvallis, Ore., up to $226 million to advance the design of tiny nuclear reactors that would be installed under water, making meltdown far less likely and opening the door to markets around the world where the reactors now on the market are too big for local power grids.
Wind farms get extended leeway on eagle deaths
In a decision that highlights the clash between two cherished environmental goals — producing green energy and preserving protected wildlife — federal officials announced Friday that some wind power companies will be allowed to kill or injure bald and golden eagles for up to 30 years without penalty. Conservation groups